Tony Romo Jersey

Tony Romo, byname of Antonio Romario Romo, (born April 21, 1980, San Diego, California, U.S.), American professional gridiron football player who emerged as one of the leading quarterbacks in the National Football League (NFL) in the early 21st century.

Romo spent most of his childhood in southern Wisconsin, where he idolized Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett Favre, whose aggressive, risk-taking style of play he eventually sought to emulate. Although Romo was a standout player for Burlington (Wisconsin) High School, he was not recruited by the major college football teams and wound up attending Eastern Illinois University, a Division I-AA school in Charleston, Illinois. At Eastern Illinois he was a three-time (2000–02) Ohio Valley Conference Player of the Year, and in his senior season he received the Walter Payton Award as Division I-AA’s top offensive player.

Despite being eligible for the 2003 NFL draft, Romo was again overlooked. Later that year he signed with the Dallas Cowboys as an undrafted free agent, but he earned little playing time in his first three seasons. He did not take over as starting quarterback until 2006, when he replaced an aging Drew Bledsoe near midseason. Romo blossomed almost immediately in the starter’s role, helping the Cowboys land a wild-card spot in the play-offs. His ability to improvise plays and his willingness to throw downfield quickly made him a fan favourite. He finished the season having passed for 19 touchdowns and 2,903 yards and became the first Cowboys quarterback to be selected for the Pro Bowl since Troy Aikman in 1996.

Although Romo was blamed for the Cowboys’ 2006 play-off loss to the Seattle Seahawks—he dropped the snap on a potentially game-winning field goal attempt—he returned to lead the team to a 12–1 start in 2007, the best in franchise history. The Cowboys went on to win their first National Football Conference (NFC) East Division title in nine years, and Romo finished the regular season with 36 touchdowns and 4,211 passing yards. However, the Cowboys were upset by the rival New York Giants in their opening play-off game, and Romo’s performance in big games began to be called into question by some observers. The criticism grew louder in 2008 when the Cowboys suffered a 44–6 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles in the final game of the season with a play-off berth on the line. In 2009 Romo gained a measure of redemption as he passed for a career-high 4,483 yards (which was also a franchise record) and led the Cowboys to their first postseason victory in 14 years.

A fractured clavicle limited Romo to just six games during the 2010 season. In each of the following three years, the Cowboys finished with 8–8 records, missing the play-offs by losing to a division rival in the final week of the regular season each time. While Romo produced solid statistics over those seasons—including breaking the Cowboys’ single-season passing mark with 4,903 yards in 2012—the team’s mediocrity led to the continuation of the “Romo is not clutch” narrative. Although he threw a fair number of poorly timed interceptions, Romo was in fact among the league leaders in fourth-quarter passer rating during his career and led numerous game-winning drives. He had his best professional season in 2014, leading the NFL with a 113.2 passer rating while throwing 34 touchdowns and 9 interceptions. Dallas won a division title that season, and Romo led a game-winning fourth-quarter drive in the team’s opening play-off contest, but the Cowboys were eliminated in the team’s next postseason game. Romo was once again sidelined by an injury in 2015 as a broken collar bone limited him to just four games, and the Cowboys staggered to a 4–12 record in his absence. In 2016 Romo was once more bitten by the injury bug when a broken bone in his back sidelined him until midseason. However, the stellar play of rookie quarterback Dak Prescott, who ultimately led Dallas to an NFC-best 13–3 record, forced Romo into a back-up role after he returned to the active roster.

In April 2017 he abruptly retired from the NFL and immediately joined CBS as a commentator for NFL television broadcasts. At the time of his retirement, Romo had thrown for 34,183 yards (29th most in NFL history), 248 touchdowns (21st all-time), and had a 97.1 career passer rating (fourth highest ever).

Tony Romo has been accurately predicting plays since he left the field and went to CBS’ booth starting in the 2017 NFL season.

Transitioning to broadcasting almost immediately after retirement, Romo has repeatedly proved over the last two years that he is able to read defenses just as fast as the quarterbacks on the field and can anticipate a specific play seconds before the snap.

Most recently, he stunned viewers watching the AFC championship game almost two weeks ago. In the New England Patriots’ 37-31 overtime win against the Kansas City Chiefs, he correctly predicted the Patriots’ movements multiple times, and NFL fans were amazed. And with CBS broadcasting the 2019 Super Bowl matchup between New England and the Los Angeles Rams, Romo will have one more opportunity this season to prove he’s basically psychic.

And because of that, The Wall Street Journal took an impressively deep dive into Romo’s broadcasts this season. It reviewed all 2,599 plays from every game the former Dallas Cowboys quarterback called this season and counted the number of times he made a specific prediction, as opposed to a general observation.

Romo has made 72 play predictions so far this season and was correct 68 percent of the time, according to the WSJ’s calculations. And that means statistically, he’s better at predicting NFL plays from the booth than completing passes because his career completion percentage is 65.3.

It’s more physics than metaphysics, Romo says. He looks at the field and understands the tendencies of the players and coordinators. He combines his knowledge of those teams with his knowledge as a player who not long ago would be the guy calling the play in the huddle. Maybe the offense is lined up in a particular formation. Or it’s the defense gearing up for something unusual. From all those variables he makes a calculation.

“In some ways, it’s like math,” Romo says.

“People think Tony’s a fortune teller, but this isn’t guesswork and this isn’t psychic ability,” said Jim Nantz, his partner in the booth. “He’s not getting some sort of message from the gods. He’s seeing what Brady saw.”

Looking ahead to the Super Bowl, it seems like Romo is set up to impress viewers once again. According to the WSJ’s analysis, 16 of Romo’s predictions during broadcasts this season were in five Patriots games with Tom Brady on the field, and his accuracy was even higher in those instances at 69 percent.

Tony Romo Jersey

Traditionally, in sports broadcasting, a color commentator’s job is to explain to viewers what they just saw. But, during the past few weeks of N.F.L. playoff games, Tony Romo, a former quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys, who will call the Super Bowl on Sunday as an analyst for CBS, has delighted football fans by doing something else: telling them what they’re about to see.

Romo, who retired two years ago, after a very good but not outstanding career with the Cowboys, has been doing this since he first became a broadcaster, last year. But his prophetic abilities were on particularly fine display in the recent A.F.C. championship game between the New England Patriots and the Kansas City Chiefs. On play after play—fifteen, in all—Romo described what he thought was about to unfold; he guessed correctly thirteen times. (On Twitter, he was dubbed Romostradamus.) He predicted passes to specific players in specific areas. He tabbed a coming blitz by the defense and how many people would be blitzing. “Gronk is out wide!” he said at one point, referring to the Patriots’ tight end Rob Gronkowski. “Watch this safety! If he comes down, it’s a good chance he’s throwing out there!” The safety came down, and the throw, from the Patriots’ quarterback, Tom Brady, to Gronkowski, was complete. Twice, the offensive team did something other than what Romo predicted, and both times the results were poor—one play ended with an incomplete pass, and the other with a turnover. It seemed that, even when Romo was wrong, he was right.

It is not surprising that the pioneer of this divinatory style of play-calling is an ex-quarterback. N.F.L. playbooks can be hundreds or thousands of pages long, and, for each play, the Q.B. must know the assignments of the other ten offensive players on the field. Before the ball is snapped, the quarterback has, usually, about fifteen seconds to set the offensive line’s protection scheme, read a defense’s disguised coverage, and decide if the play that was called is the right one. Mental processing is a talent, like lateral quickness or arm strength, and N.F.L. Q.B.s drill cognitive acuity as much as they do throwing mechanics. (Brady markets his own “brain training” techniques. Whether they work is another matter.)

But that Romo, in particular, would be the quarterback to blaze the trail is a surprise. Whereas Brady, widely considered the best quarterback in league history, exploits inefficiencies like a quant at a hedge fund, Romo was more improvisational—a little loose, even, as if he were just playing with friends in the back yard. “If you want me to tell you the truth, when I first got him, he was an indiscriminate passer,” Bill Parcells, the former head coach who brought Romo to the Cowboys, told me recently. “He’d throw that son of a bitch anywhere.”

If you go through old footage from NFL Films, you can find clips from early in Romo’s career that testify to Parcells’s description. During training camp in 2003, Romo’s rookie season, Parcells barks at his Q.B., “Come on, Romo, you should’ve known pre-snap what to do there!” In a quieter moment, the coach delivers a lecture on the necessity of thinking fast, lest Romo be crushed by the defense. “You gotta get the ball out of your hands. You’re gonna get killed. They’ll be licking their chops. You’ll be like liverwurst on rye!”

It’s not that Romo had a slow mind—it’s just that he hadn’t seen enough plays to start recognizing patterns. It’s hard stuff. To speed up the process, some teams now use virtual-reality video, captured during practice from cameras perched a few inches above a quarterback’s helmet, so that, later, he can take simulated repetitions. The quarterbacks coach at the University of Southern California once invited me to try one of these V.R. headsets, when I was a reporter for the Los Angeles Times. Going in, I knew the speed would be incredible. What I didn’t anticipate was that the action on the field would look like complete nonsense. The linemen heaved, the little guys flitted, and I felt as though I were watching a flock of birds in synchronous motion. It was fascinating to witness, but all the players appeared to be following some dictate that surpassed my understanding.

I asked Parcells if I watched enough film, thousands and thousands of hours, could I or another layman see the field like Romo does? Not unless I was an unusually quick thinker, he said. He didn’t sound optimistic.

Romo, though, learned to make sense of such disorder while riding the bench for three years. By the time he became a starter, he was one of the league’s best passers. He prepared diligently and thought quickly; very rarely was he liverwurst on rye. In the course of his career, he watched hundreds of plays from the bench, lived through thousands more on the field, and then relived them many times over in the film room—perfect training for a commentator.

Much has been made about Tony Romo’s psychic football powers. But how many times does he actually correctly predict a play before it happens?

The Wall Street Journal watched 46 hours of every play Romo called this season. According to the Wall Street Journal, he made 72 predictions this season and was right 68 percent of the time.

Romo credits his in-game predictions to his knowledge as a former quarterback and his understanding of player tendencies and coaches.

“In some ways, it’s like math,” Romo told the Wall Street Journal.

Romo’s fortune-teller ability rose to an all-time high during the AFC Championship Game. The former Cowboys quarterback correctly predicted four plays on New England’s game-winning drive, including when Tom Brady handed the ball off to Rex Burkhead for the game-winning touchdown.

Super Bowl watchers might want listen closely to what Romo has to say during Sunday’s game. The Wall Street Journal calculated that ‘Romostrodamus’ made 16 predictions while calling New England games this season, and he was accurate 69 percent of the time.